National Jewish Population Survey (NJPS) 2000-01

Sponsor(s): United Jewish Communities (now The Jewish Federations of North America)

Principal Investigator(s): Laurence Kotler-Berkowitz, Steven M. Cohen, Vivian Klaff, Frank Mott, Lorraine Blass, Jim Schwartz, Jonathon Ament

Study Dates: August 21, 2000 - August 30, 2001

Population Estimates:

The 2000-01 National Jewish Population Survey reported a total of 5.2 million Jewish persons living in the United States -  4.1 million Jewish adults and 1 million Jewish children living in a household with a Jewish adult, plus another estimated  100,000 Jews living in institutional settings,

Sample:

The NJPS 2000-01 completed Jewish interviews are part of a larger data file on American Religious Identity, the 2000-01 NSRE (the National Study on Religion and Identity),

A total of 5,148 interviews with randomly selected Jewish respondents are included in the data file.  Of these (variable "J1"), there are 4,147 complete interviews with Jewish respondents and 376 interviews with respondents who are labelled as "Jewish-connected."  Some of the Jewish-connected interviews do not include all topics, since the respondent may not have been defined as Jewish-connected originally, but as a person of Jewish background (PJB).  Thus, the data file includes data on 4,523 Jewish respondents

Another 625 interviews were completed with persons who are best described as being of Jewish origin, Jewish background -  PJB.  Some of these interviews were originally defined as Jewish.   See the discussion of classifying respondents as Jewish in the Appendix of  the basic "Strength, Challenge and Diversity..." report

Users intending to use the data file should read the "Study Documentation," the "Appendices to Study Documentation" and especially the "Data File User Guide."

Sample Size: 5,148 completed interviews.

Sample Notes:

NJPS 2000-01 survey questions pertained to the Jewish survey respondent, or to the household as a unit, about all children in the household with a special set of questions asked only about a randomly selected child in the household.

Users should review the weighting discussion in the NJPS documentation.  In general, three weights are typically used, depending on the topic/question.

First, the respondent weight (wt3resp) is used when the data are designed to represent all Jewish adults in the U.S., This weight variable is designed to extrapolate to the estimated number of adult Jews living in households in the U.S.

Second, a household weight (wt2hh) should be used when the question applies to a household, and not a respondent. 

Finally, when questions were only asked about a randomly-selected child within the household, wt4hhch should be used.

Study Notes:

The basic summary of NJPS 2000-01 findings are presented in Strength, Challenge and Diversity in the American Jewish Population....

In addition, there were a series of reports which covered special topics included in the survey questionnaire such as economic vulnerability, volunteerism, the Jewish education of Jewish children, Israel connections, Nazi Victims residing in the U.S. (see also Methodology Series research note #4 under Other Documentation), Jewish elderly, immigrants to the U.S., religious denominations, the impact of a Jewish childhood on adults' Jewish identity, Jewish education of respondents, geographical differences within the U.S., and philanthropic giving.  All are available under "Survey Reports."

A series of slide shows were also created and are available on the right. The basic slide set accompanying the Strength, Challenge, Diversity....slide set available on right side,  as are a series of thirteen other special slide sets  -  including focused PPT presentations on younger Jewish adults, different geographic areas of the U.S., small Jewish communities, employment and vocational issues, and various denomination-focused slide sets.

NJPS-2000-01 was not without controversy.  After an initial set of findings were released, it was discovered that the research firm conducting the survey had lost a large number of unresolved screening interviews from a significant number of sampling replicates. 

Please see the "Schulman 2003 study review Memo" under "Other Documentation for a review of the NJPS data collection experience by Mark Schulman.  It includes documentation of the basic issue of survey quality, as well as a series of CATI (computer-assisted telephone interviewing software) errors that plagued the survey. 

The NJPS researchers also documented all phases of the survey research process -  please see "Study Documentation" report -  a number of issues on data retention are discussed on pp. 25 ff.

In addition, the UJC (United Jewish Communities) Research Department issues a series of seven brief reports on methodological questions that were asked by users of the study.  They are combined as one PDF "NJPS-2000-01 Methodology Series ALL 7 Methodology Articles Combined" in "other Documentation."  The topics covered are: (1) Comparing data estimates from NJPS-NSRE, GSS and AJIS; (2) Comparing estimates of Former Soviet Union nation Jews from NJPS and data from HIAS, the Hebrew Aid Immigrant Society; (3) Comparing estimates of Israelis in the U.S. NJPS and Census data; (4) Comparing estimates of Holocaust Survivors with Claims Conference estimates -  in this research note, the range of U.S. survivors in 2001 was presented as 122,000 - 142,000 compared to the 122,000 estimate in the original research report on Nazi victims; (5) comparisons of Jewish school enrollment data from NJPS and the Avi Chai Foundation estimates; (6) tests for non-response bias, and (7) "Testing for Jewish Denial." 

Additional weights: rimwgt2, wt2hhcp, rsfwgt, gnawgt, wt3resp, wt4hhch

Language: English


Downloads

Survey Reports

» Strength, Challenge, and Diversity in the American Jewish Population, A United Jewish Communities Report
(PDF)

» Economic Vulnerability in the American Jewish Population
(PDF)

» Geographic Differences Among American Jews
(PDF)

» American Jewish Religious Denominations
(PDF)

» Israel Connections and American Jews
(PDF)

» Philanthropic Giving Among Jews
(PDF)

» Volunteerism among American Jews
(PDF)

» Jewish Immigrants in the United States
(PDF)

» The Jewish Education of Jewish Children
(PDF)

» The Impact of Childhood Jewish Education on Adults' Jewish Identity
(PDF)

» Jewish Educational Background: Trends and Variations Among Today's Jewish Adults
(PDF)

» The American Jewish Elderly
(PDF)

» Nazi Victims Now Residing in the United States
(PDF)

Slide Sets

» NJPS 2000-01 Slides Accompanying Summary Report: "Strength, Challenges and Diversity in the U.S. Jewish Population
(PDF)

» Jewish Adults Ages 18-29
(PDF)

» Jewish College Students
(PDF)

» Jewish Baby Boomers
(PDF)

» Adult Jewish Education Report
(PDF)

» Findings on Employment and Vocational Issues
(PDF)

» Geographic Differences Among American Jews
(PDF)

» Jews in Small Communities
(PDF)

» New Jersey Jews
(PDF)

» Jews in the Midwest
(PDF)

» Jews in the West
(PDF)

» Orthodox Jews
(PDF)

» Conservative Jews
(PDF)

» Reform Jews
(PDF)

Documentation, Questionnaires and Frequencies

» Screener Questionnaire
(PDF)

» Main Interview Questionnaire
(PDF)

» Codebook (Unweighted Frequencies)
(PDF)

» Study Documentation
(PDF)

» Appendices to Study Documentation
(XLS)

Data Files and Data Definitions

» Data File User Guide
(PDF)

» Zipped SPSS Data File
(ZIP)

Other Documentation

» Schulman 2003 Study Review Memo
(PDF)

» NJPS-2000-01 Methodology Series ALL Methodology Reports (1-7) Combined
(PDF)

» 1-Religion in America Comparing Data from NSRE-NJPS, GSS and ARIS
(PDF)

» 2-Jews from the Former Soviet Union - Reconciling Estimates from NJPS and HIAS
(PDF)

» 3-Israelis in the United States - Reconciling Estimates with NJPS
(PDF)

» 4-Comparing Estimates of Holocaust Survivors
(PDF)

» 5-Enrollment Estimates in Selected Types of Jewish Education NJPS and the Avi Chai Foundation
(PDF)

» 6-Non-Response Bias Test - Jewish Religious Denominations
(PDF)

» 7-Testing for Jewish Denial
(PDF)

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