2013-Dallas Jewish Community Scan

Sponsor(s): Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas

Principal Investigator(s): Sacha Litman, Hannah Feinberg

Key Findings:

The Dallas Jewish Community Scan, conducted in 2013 by Measuring Success, LLC, collected data on Jewish life in Dallas via the Internet from 4,825 respondents, selected from lists of Jewish households/persons compiled from over 50 member agencies in Greater Dallas.

The Jewish Community Scan Flipbook is a 16 page summary of the 2013 Jewish Community scan, available as a PDF download at the DataBank (right side of this page), but also available as an online report via the link to the left at the Federation study page.

The "Complete Overview" report provides a summary of study goals, research processes and study findings in a 144 page report/slide show.

The major topics/sections covered in the 2013 Scan (following the Complete Overview model) include:

•  An Overview of the Needs and Perceptions Project -  Jewish Community Scan

•  Methodology

•  Response Demographics

•  Jewish Life and Learning

•  Philanthropy

•  Jewish Membership Organizations

•  Jewish Preschools; Jewish Primary School

•  Jewish Summer Camp

•  Jewish After-school programs

•  Jewish life on college campuses

•  Social Services 

•  Adult Mental Health, Child Mental Health, Children/Adults with Special Needs

•  Senior Residential Facilities, Senior Assessment and Case Management

•  Career and Employment Services

•  Home Health Care

Please note that almost all of the individual sections of the Complete Overview report (such as Philanthropy) are available via the Federation study page (link on left side of this overview page).  If a DataBank user only wants one section, or several only, please download it/them through the study website.

Sample:

The 2013 scan sampling process began with a list of 140,000 names from 50 Jewish organizations which partnered with the Federation for the project; many names were duplicated on the lists, and many were probably no longer active at the organizations.

A total of 40,000 names remained after un-duplication and deletion of those who were deceased or had moved from the area.  Of these 40,000, 25,000 had valid emails (either from the contributing organization or via Internet search and append techniques).

4,825 respondents replied to the email invitation to complete the Internet survey.

LIST study with likely over-representation of affiliated Jewish households and under-representation of minimally connected or non-connected Jewish households.  Report notes that some degree of participation by minimally connected/non-connected Jewish household was achieved, with a total of 653 respondents classified as low engagement Jews based on survey results.

Language: English